How to conjugate Phrasal Verbs?

How to conjugate Phrasal Verbs?

It’s time for a new English lesson on phrasal verbs! This time, we’re going over the conjugation of phrasal verbs.

By now, you already know that a phrasal verb consists of a verb which is followed by one or more prepositions, and that they all are treated as a single verb and have one meaning. There are two types of phrasal verbs: inseparable phrasal verbs and separable phrasal verbs.

how to conjugate phrasal verbs

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Inseparable phrasal verbs

Inseparable phrasal verbs are the ones that always behave as a single word, which means that the preposition cannot be separated from the verb when the verb has a direct object.

For example: run into

My sister ran into her ex-boyfriend this morning.

You cannot write or say: My sister ran her ex-boyfriend into this morning.

 

Separable phrasal verbs

 

Separable phrasal verbs are phrasal verbs in which the preposition can be separated from the verb when the verb has a direct object. Bear in mind that separable phrasal verbs are always separated when the direct object is a pronoun.

 

For example:

Let me look this word up in a dictionary.

Let me look it up in a dictionary.

 

It useful to bear in mind this distinction between phrasal verbs when you form English sentences. It’s always a plus when you know that you can and should separate the verb from the preposition.

 

Now that we mentioned the two types of phrasal verbs, it’s time to explain the conjugation of phrasal verbs.

 

So, how do we conjugate phrasal verbs? What is, for example, the present perfect simple of look up?

We conjugate phrasal verbs the same way we conjugate other verbs. So, this means that the present perfect simple of look up is have/has looked up.

This means that the verb of a phrasal verb is conjugated just like it is conjugated when it isn’t part of a phrasal verb. So, you conjugate look in look up the way you normally do it.

Let’s have a look at a phrasal verb that doesn’t contain an irregular verb, for example, cross out.

             Present Simple                            cross out

             Present Progressive                am/is crossing out

             Past Simple                              crossed out

             Past Progressive                      were/was crossing out

             Present Perfect Simple            have/has crossed out

             Present Perfect Progressive    have/has been crossing out

             Past Perfect Simple                 had crossed out

             Past Perfect Progressive         had been crossing out

             Future I Simple (will)                  will cross out

             Future I Simple (be going to)    am/is going to cross out

             Future I Progressive               will be crossing out

             Future II Simple                     will have crossed out

             Future II Progressive             will have been crossing out

 

Now, let’s take a look at a phrasal verb that contains an irregular verb, for example, run into.

             Present Simple                       run into

             Present Progressive               am/is running into

             Past Simple                            ran into

             Past Progressive                    were/was running into

             Present Perfect Simple         have/has run into

             Present Perfect Progressive have/has been running into

             Past Perfect Simple                  had run into

             Past Perfect Progressive          had been running into

             Future I Simple (will)               will run into

             Future I Simple (be going to) am/is going to run into

             Future I Progressive           will be running into

             Future II Simple                  will have run into

             Future II Progressive              will have been running into