How to form and use the Present Perfect Progressive?

How to form and use the Present Perfect Progressive?

By now, you already know that every simple tense form has its progressive counterpart. So, obviously, there must be one for the present perfect simple.

You guessed it right. There is one, and it is called the present perfect progressive.

How to form and use the Present Perfect Progressive-.png

WHY USE THE PRESENT PERFECT PROGRESSIVE?

Like every progressive tense, the present perfect progressive is used for an action in progress over a period of time. But, because of its perfect aspect, it is used for an action over the period of time leading up to the present.

You can often see that the present perfect progressive appears with time expressions such as recently, lately, this week, since, for the last couple of days, etc.

When it comes to the form of the present perfect progressive, you’ll see that it is so simple to form it. Just remember to pay attention to the spelling of the ing-form.

FORM

·        To form the present perfect progressive, we have the present of have + been + ing-form.

I have been playing tennis since two o’clock.

o   Remember! I/you/we/you/they have, but he/she/it has.

·        To make a positive sentence we have:

the subject + have/has + been + the main verb in the ing-form + the object

I have been playing tennis for a while now.

·        To make a negative sentence we have:

the subject + have/has + not + been + the main verb in the ing-form + the object

I have not been playing tennis for a while now.

o   We can contract have not/has not into haven’t/hasn’t.

·        To make an interrogative sentence we have:

Have/Has + the subject + been + the main verb in the ing-form + the object

Have I been playing tennis for a while now?


Keep reading and learn MORE TIPS TO IMPROVE your English Grammar.

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Do you remember the spelling tips mentioned in the past progressive post? Here are some:

·        We double b, g, l, m, n, p, r, t.

·        Only consonants in stressed syllables are doubled!

·        We double consonants when the words end in a consonant after a vowel.

For more details, click here

See? Simple and easy :)

 

Uses of the Present Perfect Continuous !

Lets learn about some of the uses of the present perfect continuous

 

I’m going to explain to you 3 main uses of the present perfect progressive:

1.    We can use the present perfect progressive for an action or a situation which started in the past and is still going on.

 

o   The action can be continuing in the present.

Where are you? I have been waiting for you for half an hour now. Hurry up! – The action continues in the present, meaning that I am still waiting.

 

o   The action may have ended recently, but has present results.

I’m all wet because I’ve been walking in the rain. – I stopped walking in the rain a short time ago, so I’m still wet.

 

o   This is, of course, not possible with verbs which are not used in the continuous forms. That’s why we use the present perfect simple.

How long have you known that?

He has been in hospital since his accident.

 

2.    The present perfect progressive can be used for a series of repeated actions in the period leading up to the present.

I’ve been going to cinema very often recently.

o   NOTE: used only when it is not mentioned how many actions took place!

 

3.    The present perfect progressive is often used to talk about people’s use of their time up to the present.

Jake has been talking non-stop since Joanna came here.

 

Many English learners have some doubts about when to use the present perfect simple and the present perfect progressive. I’m going to mention a few differences you need to pay attention to. Study these so that you don’t make mistakes! :)

·        The present perfect simple focuses on the result of the action, while the present perfect progressive focuses on the action itself.

I’ve run ten miles, so I’m tired now. I’ve been running, so I’m hot now.

·        The present perfect simple is used when we say how much or how many, while the present perfect progressive is used when we say how long.

Sam has read twenty pages.Sam has been reading the book since two o’clock.

·        We use the present perfect simple when we say how many actions, but we can use the present perfect progressive for repeated actions.

I’ve tried to phone you at least ten times. – I have been trying to phone you all morning.

·        We use the present perfect simple for a state up to the present time, but we do not use the present perfect progressive for states.

I’ve always hated spiders.

 

That’s all for today! Remember, learn English, speak English, have fun with English! :)

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